Our Monthly Sock Subscription boxes have some great themes coming up, along with some incredible one-of-a-kind designs from artists new to the SITM family. A couple reasons you’ll looove our monthly boxes:

  • These boxes make incredible gifts! Gift a loved one a joyous surprise that’ll land on their doorstep every month, delivered by our magical flying ponies.
  • You get a super-secret bonus surprise every month! From temporary tattoos to donations to important causes and more, we want to make you go 🙂 😁😍
  • When we say these subscriptions include exclusive socks, we mean it! We’ve got artist collaborations coming up that you’re sure to drool over.

May’s subscription box is literary-themed, so we asked the SITM team for some book recommendations and boy did they deliver. Check out their recs below! (We’ll try to include links to purchase these books from AAPI-owned bookstores, since May is also Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month.)

Lou (Warehouse – VAS/QC)

Detransition, Baby by Torrey Peters is a fiction novel with trans characters (yay, we love to see it!) navigating motherhood in unconventional ways.

Where the Crawdads Sing by Delia Owens is a literary fiction/mystery with some romance that follows a young girl in the wild – I loved this book specifically for the way they captured nature.

White Folks be Trippin’ by J Mase III – An ethnography through poetry and prose, BIG FAN of this one, it’s a short easy read that will remind you of your white privilege (which we all need).

Outlawed by Anna North – an alternate history/western fiction with such a gentle look on gender and gender roles, not to mention a bangin’ story about feminism and being a bad ass!

Dre (Web Graphics Designer & Photographer)

1984 by George Orwell – It’s a good cautionary tale about government surveillance. Especially with growing government surveillance around the world through A.I, mass data collection, facial recognition and most prominently the social credit system in China.

Fire Next Time by James Baldwin – I think James Baldwin articulates what it feels like to be Black in America really well. It also talks about religion and race which is another interesting topic.

Killing the Black Body by Dorothy E. Roberts – While I don’t have personal opinions on the book yet, the topic of forced sterilization and reproductive rights isn’t discussed very much when we talk about racism/sexism. So I thought it’d be a good idea to share it.

Erin (Director of Marketing & eCommerce Channel)

Eleanor Oliphant Is Completely Fine by Gail Honeyman – a book I just couldn’t put down. The leading character has lived her own “completely fine” life after a major trauma, but as she uncovers friendship and love, everything changes.  It was an incredibly heartwarming and often humorous story.

Kisa (Operations Director)

The Mistborn Trilogy by Brandon Sanderson – The Mistborn Trilogy is not a lighthearted escapist adventure. It is a grim world. Sometimes, when the world I’m in seems gloomy, I like to go someplace gloomier and watch people fight to make it better. That is what I get from these novels. It ends up giving just the right balance of joy and misery to make it riveting. My biggest pet peeves in fantasy novels are whiny characters who are given vague magic powers that conveniently solve all their problems. These books star a truly likable protagonist, whose magic belongs to a clearly defined system with inherent limitations.

Greg (eCommerce Developer)

Space Is The Place: The Lives And Times Of Sun Ra by John Szwed – I can’t summarize Sun Ra. His fingerprints are all over the place, his band is still playing.

The Left Hand of Darkness by Ursula K LeGuin. Not done with this one yet, but it’s a cool concept: a sci-fi story about diplomacy, mysticism, and identity (gender and otherwise)!

Laurie (Digital Content Specialist)

1Q84 by Haruki Murakami – This was the first book of Murakami’s I read, and while it’s thick one, it made me fall in love with his writing. His magical realism allows me to be completely submersed in the world he has created, and it’s always hard for me to leave.

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